HOME SHARED LETTERS RATINGS MY PLANET COMMUNITIES MISSION SIGN UP!
Shared Letters

Join and browse our exclusive open discussion forums and talk about whatever you like.

Channels
» The Suggestion Box
» Company Responses
» PFB Feedback Line
» Consumer Podcasts
» Mommy Talk & Daddy Dialogue ™
» Shared Letters


Newsletter

Sign up for PlanetFeedback's "Consumer Café" email newsletter!





Radio Shack Violates Visa Acceptance Procedures

Posted Mon October 26, 2009 12:00 pm, by Aaron A. written to Visa International

Write a Letter to this Company


A merchant required photo ID as condition of accepting my Visa card. There was no valid reason for required photo ID; the item purchased was not restricted, alcoholic, etc.; it was a charger for my mobile phone.

I inquired why photo ID was reuqired and the clerk simply told me "because you should credit" [as opposed to debit].

The merchant that required ID was a RadioShack, store XX at XXXX in Louisville, KY; phone: (502) XXX-XXXX.

Below is another store that required photo ID to process credit card transactions. This store actually has a sign posted indicate that ID is required for credit transactions (and for no good reason, other than it's credit).

Wilsons Leather
Gaffney, SC 29341

I informed the clerk that present photo ID is not required and the only requirement on my behalf is that I present the card with signature on the back panel. The clerk persisted that I present photo ID, and as I had no other means of payment (no cash), I was forced to comply against Visa's rules.

I provided feedback to RadioShack directly, and even pointed out Visa's Rules for Merchants, Card Acceptance and Chargeback Management Guidelines published on Visa's web site. A district manager contacted me from out of state and said she could not alter corporate policy but said she would forward on the information to upper management.

I visited another RadioShack and there seemed to be no such policy to require photo ID for a Visa transaction. In fact, the second store I visited was one of few stores that actually bothered to check if my card was signed.

It is a hassle to have to present photo ID for credit card transactions. I would like the banks which signed these stores to inform the appropriate personnel that requiring photo ID is in violation of Visa's Rules for Merchants.


Reply



Log In/Create an account | 70 comments
     Add to your del.icio.us  del.icio.us    Digg this story  Digg this  
PlanetFeedback Comments are subject to strict terms and conditions. We reserve the right to deny site membership privileges to any individuals acting inappropriately.
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 2:18 PM


CREDIT CARD SIGNATURE IS ALL THE ID NEEDED

When you pay for merchandise with a Visa card, MasterCard, or American
Express any store that accepts these cards should accept yours too, no
questions asked. It's part of the deal that merchants agree to when
they become participating members.

They must check your signature and the card - electronically or by
telephone - to be sure it's valid. Once the answer comes up yes, they
can go ahead and charge. They can't ask you for any further
identification - not a license plate number, Social Security number,
proof of address, phone number or photo ID.

Your personal ID isn't needed because Visa, MasterCard, and American
Express all guarantee payment on cards that have been properly
checked. If the issuer mistakenly authorizes a sale on a bad card, it
should make good. MasterCard says that merchants receive instant
settlement. The contract MasterCard merchants sign specifically
prevents them from asking for personal ID.

Unfortunately, not all merchants play by the rules. Some, apparently,
haven't read them.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

MasterCard wants to hear about merchants who break their rules. Send
the name and address and an account of what happened to MasterCard
WorldWide 2000 Purchase St. Purchase, NY 10577 or call 1-800-300-3069.
The merchant's bank will get a stiff letter, ordering it to
investigate and bring the offending store into line - or pay a $2,000
fine. You may also report violations online:

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

Visa enforces the same rules as MasterCard. "When we hear about a
violation, we ask the bank that signed the merchant to get together
with the merchant and see that the practice is stopped," Visa
representative states. Violations of Visa’s Operating Regulations
result in fines of no less than $5,000. To report a merchant, write to
Visa Inc. P.O. Box 8999 San Francisco, CA 94128-8999 or call
1-800-VISA-911.

American Express also prohibits merchants from asking for IDs. "All a
merchant is supposed to do is take an imprint, make sure the signature
matches and swipe the card through the terminal, to get
authorization." Report violations to: American Express P.O. Box 297812
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-7812 or call 1-800-528-4800 or report online:
http://americanexpress.com/yourchoice



Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 2:17 PM


Obviously it is a major security and identity theft risk, extreme
invasion of privacy, and a no-brainer to keep your ID to yourself. No
reasonable adult would hand over their ID to some violating cashier on
demand. The most important thing is making sure it never happens
again, so if any violating merchant should ever pop-up in your
community, make sure they are eliminated/brought back into line
immediately - 1-800-VISA-911.

Never show ID with credit cards.

No ID required with credit cards. Merchants cannot require ID.

If a merchant tries to require ID, immediately call 1-800-VISA-911 to
ensure they never do again.

VISA: 1-800-VISA-911
MasterCard: 1-800-300-3069


Also easily report merchant violations online:

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

Check the box that says “Merchant required ID”


Make sure your community is 100% violation-free.




Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 2:15 PM


To report, simply call 1-800-VISA-911, press zero twice, and ask to
file an "incident report" regarding a merchant violation/merchant who
required ID. Crooked merchants shape-up quickly to avoid suspension.
Make sure your community is 100% violation-free.



Reply

by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 2:10 PM


Walmart did the same thing a few years ago around Christmas time, they
were asking for ID with every credit card purchase, regardless if the
card was signed. I refused and got the police and security involved, I
swiped my card got an approval, and bagged myself, when they asked for
ID, I asked why because they had an automated approval and signatures
matched, they said "local policy", I said I am not showing ID and I am
leaving with my merchandise. LP and security tried to stop me and put
their hands on me while I was leaving, I called 911, pressed charges
for assault against store LP, and luckily I had the letter from VISA/
MC (I reported them a week prior and had it with me knowing this would
happen) and the VISA and MC letter said it is prohibited to ask for ID
unless it was a "code 10/suspicious transaction" or the auth response
requested sig. I showed that to the police and they let me go,
arrested the LP staff, and I sued Walmart for harassment, assault, and
misc. damages, and they gave me $50k. I dropped the charges against
the individuals only after they agreed to an additional civil
restitution of $2500 a piece, and Walmart removed the signs and the
manager got fired.

So yes, call 1-800-VISA-911 and report them, they will send you a
letter as your ammo...merchants CANNOT do this, and you will win ANY
dispute you may have.

Yes, I knew they had this policy and deliberately set them up knowing
the police and LP would be involved, but hey, I made $55k for their
violations of their contract.




Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 2:08 PM


Exposing an address or a driver's license number is completely
unacceptable for making a purchase that has no need for that
information. A $10 transaction does not need personal information to
be exposed, and a $5000 transaction does not either. Who would want to
become a target of BURGLARY because an ID check allowed a CRIMINAL to
know exactly where thousands of dollars of high end goods would be
taken after purchase?

States have stepped up to keep account numbers and expiration dates
off of receipts, for good reason. That information does not enhance
the function of a receipt, and is wholly unnecessary. Information
should be kept private except when necessary. This is security 101,
folks.

My address or driver's license number are not relevant to a credit
card purchase and have no reason to become a part of it.



Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 1:50 PM


Showing ID is the Worst Thing You Can Do.
Cashier is an Identity Thief.

Every time you give somebody your driver’s license, you are giving
them, at a minimum:

* Your full legal name
* Your address
* Your full birthday
* A number used to identify you to government agencies

Some state-issued IDs have even more information on them. But even if
yours just has the information above, an identity thief can use your
ID as a starting point for opening credit accounts in your name,
forging other identifying information, and just plain taking over your
life. They may even forge an ID in your name and convince your spouse
to sleep with them. (Your spouse does ask for ID before going to bed
each night, right? Right?)

Now you might be thinking that the cashiers behind the counter at Hot
‘n’ Trendy couldn’t possibly be identity thieves. And even if they
were, they’d only see your ID for a few seconds—not nearly enough time
to copy down or memorize your information. If you’re thinking that,
consider the following:

* Retail cashiers often make close to minimum wage. Identity
thieves make a whole lot more until they’re caught, which isn’t all
that often.
* As often as “See ID”ers show their ID, it would be virtually
impossible to pinpoint the source of any identity theft.
* Cameras that can capture all the information off your ID can be
the size of a cell phone or smaller.

Assuming you’re not peeing your pants in consumery terror, you might
be wondering if I’m just posing a hypothetical scenario. Indeed, the
bullet points above are based on a real experience from a few months
ago.

Horrifying Story Time:

My wife and I were in a clothing store with some of her friends, and
as women must spend at least one hour in any given store, I was bored
to the point of near-insanity. I started to wander the store aimlessly
and eventually heard those fateful words from behind the checkout
counter: “May I please see your ID.” Only this time, the cashier—the
only one behind the counter—sounded ecstatic, whereas no cashier in
the history of the world had ever sounded ecstatic about anything up
to that point. I was standing to the side of the counter, so I could
see the cashier’s actions behind it. As the customer handed over her
ID, I noticed the cashier tapped it on the counter a few times while
swiping the credit card with her other hand. A perfectly innocent
action, so I thought nothing of it.

A few minutes later, the next customer also paid with a credit card,
though I could see from my viewpoint that it was clearly signed on the
back with some signature scribble. Yet the cashier asked for ID. I
figured the store had simply instructed her to ID every card user—a
clear violation of their merchant’s agreement with credit card
issuers—but I decided to let it go as I was having too much fun ogling
this fine-looking cashier.

But when another customer came up a short time later and paid with a
credit card, the cashier did not ask for ID. I looked over and saw
that there was a second person behind the counter then; a closer look
at his name badge revealed he was the store manager. After the manager
left the checkout area, Hot Cashier Girl (that’s what I named her,
because she is a hot girl cashier) went right back to asking for IDs
from credit card users. Each time, she would tap the ID on the counter
while waiting for the credit card to process.

About 20 minutes had gone by, and with no sign of shopping completion
from my wife and her gang, I wandered the store briefly and returned
to my original spot on the side of the checkout counter. Another
credit card user was prompted for ID from the cashier, but this time
something strange happened: when the cashier went to present the
customer a pen and receipt for signing, the cashier dropped them on
the counter beside her and scrambled to pick them up, scattering
several items on her side of the counter in the process. After the
customer signed and left, I noticed the cashier very meticulously
return a blue lunch knapsack to its original position—lying flat but
with the bottom pointing toward her.

I finally confirmed her plot when the next customer paid by credit
card. Hot Cashier Girl wasn’t just tapping their IDs to pass the time
while cards were processed; she was purposely showing the face of the
IDs to the bottom of her lunch bag. I moved around to the other side
of the counter and confirmed my suspicions: there was a small black
hole at the bottom of her bag—just wide enough for a small camera to
film through. Hot Cashier Girl had been videotaping every single
customer’s ID.

I spotted Mr. Manager on the other side of the store and asked him why
Hot Cashier Girl might be asking for IDs. He said it definitely wasn’t
store policy. Then I asked why she might be tapping each ID in front
of her holey-bottomed knapsack. He replied, “Are you serious?” and
started walking toward the checkout counter. I rounded up my wife and
gang who were finished in that store anyway (they found nothing they
wanted) and we left. About 30 minutes later, we passed by again and I
noticed four uniformed county police officers in the store. I like to
think there were four more in the back asking Hot Cashier Girl for her
ID.

Full story here:
http://www.punny.org/money/why-writing-see-id-on-credit-cards-is-the-w
orst-thing-you-can-do/




Reply

by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 1:47 PM


1. Print the page from the PDF of both Visa and MasterCard and present
this to them when they require ID. Be sure to hand write the URLs to
these PDFs on the back of each so you can provide your source for the
information to the store management.

2. Print the MasterCard Merchant Violation Page and present this to
store management.

3. Black out your name and address on the confirmation letter you
received from Visa and present that letter the store.

4. Ask the store to show you, in writing, their policy that states ID
is required. You have provided them with documentation from the credit
card companies that ID is not allowed. Ask them to provide you with
documentation their company has produced that says otherwise. Nobody
is going to be able to come up with any such documentation because NO
retailer has ANY corporate produced materials that state to require ID
on a signed credit card transaction.



Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:42 AM


CREDIT CARD SIGNATURE IS ALL THE ID NEEDED

When you pay for merchandise with a Visa card, MasterCard, or American
Express any store that accepts these cards should accept yours too, no
questions asked. It's part of the deal that merchants agree to when
they become participating members.

They must check your signature and the card - electronically or by
telephone - to be sure it's valid. Once the answer comes up yes, they
can go ahead and charge. They can't ask you for any further
identification - not a license plate number, Social Security number,
proof of address, phone number or photo ID.

Your personal ID isn't needed because Visa, MasterCard, and American
Express all guarantee payment on cards that have been properly
checked. If the issuer mistakenly authorizes a sale on a bad card, it
should make good. MasterCard says that merchants receive instant
settlement. The contract MasterCard merchants sign specifically
prevents them from asking for personal ID.

Unfortunately, not all merchants play by the rules. Some, apparently,
haven't read them.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

MasterCard wants to hear about merchants who break their rules. Send
the name and address and an account of what happened to MasterCard
WorldWide 2000 Purchase St. Purchase, NY 10577 or call 1-800-300-3069.
The merchant's bank will get a stiff letter, ordering it to
investigate and bring the offending store into line - or pay a $2,000
fine. You may also report violations online:

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

Visa enforces the same rules as MasterCard. "When we hear about a
violation, we ask the bank that signed the merchant to get together
with the merchant and see that the practice is stopped," Visa
representative states. Violations of Visa’s Operating Regulations
result in fines of no less than $5,000. To report a merchant, write to
Visa Inc. P.O. Box 8999 San Francisco, CA 94128-8999 or call
1-800-VISA-911.

American Express also prohibits merchants from asking for IDs. "All a
merchant is supposed to do is take an imprint, make sure the signature
matches and swipe the card through the terminal, to get
authorization." Report violations to: American Express P.O. Box 297812
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-7812 or call 1-800-528-4800 or report online:
http://americanexpress.com/yourchoice




Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:39 AM


To report, simply call 1-800-VISA-911, press zero twice, and ask to
file an "incident report" regarding a merchant violation/merchant who
required ID. Crooked merchants shape-up quickly to avoid suspension.
Make sure your community is 100% violation-free.



Reply

by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:37 AM


I've gotten a couple merchants shut-off from accepting credit cards
over repeat violations of this issue (they usually change their
practice within a few hours of being shut-off; it really gets their
attention).



Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:35 AM


NO MINIMUMS
NO MAXIMUMS
NO SURCHARGES
NO ID

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

.

Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:32 AM

Demanding ID is just about the most offensive and insulting violation
the idiot cashier could do to a customer. You compare the signature
on the back of the credit card with the signature on the receipt. ID
should never be asked for at all. No one should ever be put through
such nonsense. Immediately call 1-800-VISA-911. Make sure that
horribly behaving cashier shapes-up and never asks for ID again.

Never show ID with credit cards.

No ID required with credit cards. Merchants cannot require ID.

If a merchant tries to require ID, immediately call 1-800-VISA-911 to
ensure they never do again.

VISA: 1-800-VISA-911
MasterCard: 1-800-300-3069


Also easily report merchant violations online:

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

Check the box that says “Merchant required ID”


Make sure your community is 100% violation-free.




Reply

by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:27 AM

Obviously it is a major security and identity theft risk, extreme
invasion of privacy, and a no-brainer to keep your ID to yourself. No
reasonable adult would hand over their ID to some violating cashier on
demand. The most important thing is making sure it never happens
again, so if any violating merchant should ever pop-up in your
community, make sure they are eliminated/brought back into line
immediately - 1-800-VISA-911.



Reply
by / /. Posted Mon January 18, 2010 @ 3:25 AM

CREDIT CARD SIGNATURE IS ALL THE ID NEEDED

When you pay for merchandise with a Visa card, MasterCard, or American
Express any store that accepts these cards should accept yours too, no
questions asked. It's part of the deal that merchants agree to when
they become participating members.

They must check your signature and the card - electronically or by
telephone - to be sure it's valid. Once the answer comes up yes, they
can go ahead and charge. They can't ask you for any further
identification - not a license plate number, Social Security number,
proof of address, phone number or photo ID.

Your personal ID isn't needed because Visa, MasterCard, and American
Express all guarantee payment on cards that have been properly
checked. If the issuer mistakenly authorizes a sale on a bad card, it
should make good. MasterCard says that merchants receive instant
settlement. The contract MasterCard merchants sign specifically
prevents them from asking for personal ID.

Unfortunately, not all merchants play by the rules. Some, apparently,
haven't read them.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

MasterCard wants to hear about merchants who break their rules. Send
the name and address and an account of what happened to MasterCard
WorldWide 2000 Purchase St. Purchase, NY 10577 or call 1-800-300-3069.
The merchant's bank will get a stiff letter, ordering it to
investigate and bring the offending store into line - or pay a $2,000
fine. You may also report violations online:

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/contactus/merchantviolations.
html

Visa enforces the same rules as MasterCard. "When we hear about a
violation, we ask the bank that signed the merchant to get together
with the merchant and see that the practice is stopped," Visa
representative states. Violations of Visa’s Operating Regulations
result in fines of no less than $5,000. To report a merchant, write to
Visa Inc. P.O. Box 8999 San Francisco, CA 94128-8999 or call
1-800-VISA-911.

American Express also prohibits merchants from asking for IDs. "All a
merchant is supposed to do is take an imprint, make sure the signature
matches and swipe the card through the terminal, to get
authorization." Report violations to: American Express P.O. Box 297812
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-7812 or call 1-800-528-4800 or report online:
http://americanexpress.com/yourchoice




Reply
by Eddy23 Posted Sun December 27, 2009 @ 10:13 AM

To the one who wrote about the screpancy of the photo id..
You are totally wrong about this situation... Trust me reporting a
credit card stolen is a hassle an therefore there is a lot time
waste... By showing photo id at store is really helpfull to avoid any
frauds for store and for credit card owner... ID at some store is
requiere to protect there assest... I'm pretty sure if you own store
or ur own bussines you will want to lose money because of credit
frauds

Reply


by fairywithfangs Posted Sat November 14, 2009 @ 8:47 PM

I have had my VISA debit card stolen before. Whoever stole it knew to
process it as a credit card when they bought something and managed to
wipe my account clear. Yes, I got the money back, but if someone had
ID'd this person, it might have bought more time for me to notice the
card was gone. No matter how easy your bank makes it, having your
card stolen and used sucks. badly.

While I do not know the legality behind what the clerk did...I know
from personal experience that I am happy anytime a clerk takes the
time to ID me when I use my card. I hope you never have your card
stolen, but if you think about for a moment, you will be happy they
took the time to check your ID. This really is about protecting you.

To be honest, I think all stores should require proof of ID when using
a credit card.

Reply
by elbobbo Posted Fri November 13, 2009 @ 12:35 PM

Reguiring ID for a credit card purchase is NOT a violation of Visa
terms of service. In fact most processing companies require that ID is
requested for credit purchases. I work for a company which is required
to ask for ID for anyone who has a card with no signature but others'
contracts require ID for all purchases. It is to protect the merchant
from someone claiming their card was used fraudulantly.

Reply

Re: I work for a company which is required to ask for ID by Fairbank R. Fri November 13, 2009 @ 3:17 PM

actually.. by elbobbo Sun November 29, 2009 @ 12:08 PM
by hobbs Posted Tue November 10, 2009 @ 4:44 PM

Visa Acceptance procedures cannot supercede US Code. As per United
States law:

US Code: Title 18 S. 2721
Personal information referred to in subsection (a)...may be disclosed
as follows:

(A) to verify the accuracy of personal information submitted by the
individual to the business or its agents, employees, or contractors;
and
(B) if such information as so submitted is not correct or is no longer
correct, to obtain the correct information, but only for the purposes
of preventing fraud by, pursuing legal remedies against, or recovering
on a debt or security interest against, the individual.

Reply

US Code: Title 18 S. 2721 is not applicable by Fairbank R. Wed November 11, 2009 @ 4:00 PM


but that's state motor vehicle "records", not "identification". Records mean the data the DMV has in their database about you, not the license you're issued n/t by PepperElf Thu November 12, 2009 @ 12:03 AM

by Kristen14615 Posted Fri November 6, 2009 @ 7:19 AM

I TOTALLY agree with you and that is the 1 reason I don't shop at
Radio Shack!!!! I needed an ethranet cable for work many months ago, I
grabbed my SIGNED Visa card, stuck it in my back pocket, and headed to
Radio Shack. When I swiped my card for my $7 dollar item he said he
needed my ID. I showed him my card was signed and he could match the
signatures but that I didn't have my ID on me.
Again with the policy nonsense about checking my ID for any credit
card transaction and would not sell me the cord!!! I headed to Best
Buy and bought it with no problem. I mean come on if someones spending
a good amount of money then check, but I can't imagine any criminal is
going to take the time to learn a signature and head to Radio Shack
for a $10 item.
I mean personally I don't need to be showing my ID with my address and
what not all over town. Not that I'm a paranoid weirdo about it, but
these days everyone wants your SS# and your ID. It bothers me, if you
can match the signature then that should be sufficient to make a
purchase under $100 or so...

Reply
by Jared C. Posted Mon November 2, 2009 @ 2:36 PM

If people want to complain about merchants NOT following VISA's rules,
someone should make a concerted effort to get all the little
mom-and-pop (usually Indian) stores to take credit card transactions
that are UNDER $5.00.

It is ILLEGAL to specify a minimum amount for a credit card
transaction! And TONS of little stores break this law DAILY.



Reply


This "proves" my point by Just Jeffrey Wed November 4, 2009 @ 4:40 PM

by Jared C. Posted Mon November 2, 2009 @ 2:34 PM

Just show the clerk your ID!!!!!!

I have NEVER understood why people - usually senior citizens - are so
reticent about doing this!

As a former bank teller, I cannot tell you how many times some old
fogey/codger starting belly-aching simply over me trying to protect
his or her account!

Reply
by Brett H. Posted Sun November 1, 2009 @ 2:27 PM

Visa has developed their product based on convenience, and when
merchants violate Visa's rules, the consumer value of having a Visa
card is diminished.

The famous Super Bowl ad from 1997 has Bob Dole in his hometown in
Kansas where everyone is calling out his name. He attempts to pay his
diner bill with a check, but then is hassled about needing an ID. The
message of the ad is that if he had presented his Visa checkcard, it
would have been much more convenient.

"The Visa checkcard… no questions asked; no ID needed."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbGx6kYRYj8

There was a similar ad with Daffy Duck:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zny7Dr4gPdM

So, yes, we should complain and let Visa know when merchants are in
breach of contract. I like the Visa rules just the way they are and
appreciate Visa making a convenient product.

Reply


I agree with your bottom line by Donno Sun November 1, 2009 @ 6:36 PM
by Applejacker Posted Fri October 30, 2009 @ 2:28 AM

And what if your card was stolen, used, and they did not ask for photo
ID. You would be yelling at them "Why didn't you ask for photo ID?!!!
I'm going to sue you!!!"

Reply

Re: And what if your card was stolen? by Fairbank R. Fri October 30, 2009 @ 2:38 PM

by Fairbank R. Posted Thu October 29, 2009 @ 8:43 PM

Everyone who believes that asking for identification when a credit
card is used for a purchase is unaware of the credit card
regulations.

Many who have replied before me appear to be guessing as to how credit
cards "should" be processed. Cardholders are not responsible for
fraudulent transactions on credit cards.

Also:

When should you ask a cardholder for an official government ID?
Although Visa rules do not preclude merchants from asking for
cardholder ID, merchants cannot make an ID a condition of acceptance.
Therefore, merchants cannot refuse to complete a purchase transaction
because a cardholder refuses to provide ID . Visa believes merchants
should not ask for ID as part of their regular card acceptance
procedures . Laws in several states also make it illegal for merchants
to write a cardholder’s personal information, such as an address or
phone number, on a sales receipt.

See pages 28 & 29 of the Rules For Visa Merchants at the below URL:

http://usa.visa.com/download/merchants/rules_for_visa_merchants.pdf

Reply
by FICO farmer Posted Thu October 29, 2009 @ 9:03 AM

You are upset that a vendor went the extra step to insure that the
person using the Visa card presented was inded the owner and in doing
so protect you and them against fraud? Odd. I get upset when they
don't.

Reply
by Cromax-gal Posted Wed October 28, 2009 @ 7:35 PM

This is not a biggie, a lot of stores require photo ID when using
credit. I'd rather have them ask than not, especially if someone
stole my card.

Reply


by LadyMac Posted Wed October 28, 2009 @ 5:52 PM

I work at a vet clinic on weekends ~ and sometimes I work in the front
checking people and their animals in and out.

More and more often I am seeing people who write on the back of their
credit cards "Check ID". So I do... and about 90% of them ask me why.
I flip their card over, show it to them and say 'because you asked me
to'.

Oh yeah, they say - and then they go on to comment how most places
don't ask for it despite what they've written.

It's probably that the store has been burned by people using stolen
credit cards and they want to be sure the name on the ID matches the
name on the card.


Reply


"because you asked me to" by ams1001 Sun November 1, 2009 @ 4:45 PM

by MA Cunningham Posted Wed October 28, 2009 @ 2:11 PM

. . . you were in a store that sells primarily electronic equipment.
Their fraud cases must be sky high. They have to protect themselves
from people who would rip them off with cards that aren't theirs.

For example, if you were to initiate a fraud chageback over this
transaction, the onus will be on the vendor, not the cardholder to
prove that the charge was valid, or they don't get paid!

Instead of griping about how they SHOULDN'T be checking your ID, be
grateful they do. It's going to significantly curb the chance that
your card will be able to be used there without your consent.

And just FYI, it is in no way a violation of Visa's acceptance
procedures to ask for ID - since Visa holds the merchants responsible
for their own submission they can ask you for a birth certificate, 3
utility bills and your 90 year old grandmother's maiden name if they
wanted to - and still be in compliance.

Reply


So what is the verdict? by Donno Wed October 28, 2009 @ 3:41 PM
by fishbjc Posted Wed October 28, 2009 @ 10:55 AM

I never mind having my id checked, but it DOES violate Visa/MC
Policy.

As a vendor myself, I read the policy and understood it BEFORE
agreeing to accept cc's.

What SHOULD be done is for the merchant to accept the charge while
adhering to the policy that they AGREED TO.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I did have one instance where a female handed me a Visa with the name
of a male. I refused to accept the card and the fight was on....lol

Reply

name on card by Retail Veteran Wed October 28, 2009 @ 1:49 PM


back in the 80s many places assumed that it was a spouse... by PepperElf Wed October 28, 2009 @ 2:20 PM


by batmoody Posted Wed October 28, 2009 @ 10:07 AM

No, you are not required to show ID.

The store is also not required to sell to you.

Reply

best response on the whole thread! by Michelle O. Wed October 28, 2009 @ 3:55 PM
by Amy C. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 11:47 PM

No offense, but I think Visa should allow merchants to require ID. You
obviously did have ID and just didn't want to show it as you later
complied. Just show an ID and move on. Do you know how many people I
have stopped from buying stuff because I check their ID? Most people
are glad when I make them come in to buy the Ipod for their teenagers
instead of letting their teenagers use their charge card.

Reply


i agree! I don't see what the trouble is with showing ID & think it should be required by PepperElf Wed October 28, 2009 @ 9:41 AM

by Teresa B. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 8:56 PM

I really dont understand this letter. The OP is upset that someone
wants to ID him before he uses his CC. To ENSURE that its actually
HIM that is using it and not someone who just picked it up off the
street or stole his wallet.

A hassle to present an ID with a CC? NO its a hassle when your credit
cards get stolen and then you have to go around proving it wasnt you
that just ran up 5000k worth of stuff. Now thats a hassle.

I am going through a situation right now because a person who used to
live in my apt complex stole my checks and wrote them. She forged my
name and wrote them out to her friends. who inturn cashed them. One
was for $500 the others were smaller amounts. I have had to close
that account, open another one, file a police report, explain to
merchants that "no mam/sir that wasnt me that wrote you that check"
when they bounce plus deal with my bank about removing all the
charges!

In this day and time of identiy theft and fraud, you would think a
person would WANT someone to verify who was handing them a CC before
they purchased something. Signing the back of the card is worthless!
Without a source to verify it against what good is it? How does the
clerk know that YOU are the one who signed the card and not the theif
handing it to them?

Im with the Store.

Reply


Me too! Great story! n/t by RedheadwGlasses Wed October 28, 2009 @ 12:54 PM


by Chadg Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 6:19 PM

I support requiring ID for all CC transactions, however, i believe
your complaint is entirely valid. I looked it up, Visa rules clearly
state that ID cannot be a condition of acceptance and until that
changes, we should respect that.

I feel that a business should be able to ask for ID if they think
something is suspect about the transaction or for high dollar amounts.
I would think visa would support this, but apparently not.

Did you (everyone) also know, a business can refuse a CC if it does
not bear your signature? Even if you write "See ID" it could be
rejected because its acceptance would become conditional on seeing an
ID.
I see this all the time, someone fails to sign their card, and under
my store's policy, i have to refuse the card.

Reply

by Sheldonrs Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 5:15 PM

I don't know the legalities of being required to present an ID when
using a credit card but how much of a "hassle" can it be? Do you keep
your ID in a vault?

Reply


that's what I was thinking... by ams1001 Wed October 28, 2009 @ 8:45 PM
by Fairbank R. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 4:00 PM

Many who have replied before me appear to be guessing as to how credit
cards "should" be processed. Cardholders are not responsible for
fraudulent transactions on credit cards.

Also:

When should you ask a cardholder for an official government ID?
although Visa rules do not preclude merchants from asking for
cardholder ID, merchants cannot make an ID a condition of acceptance .
Therefore, merchants cannot refuse to complete a purchase transaction
because a cardholder refuses to provide ID . Visa believes merchants
should not ask for ID as part of their regular card acceptance
procedures . Laws in several states also make it illegal for merchants
to write a cardholder’s personal information, such as an address or
phone number, on a sales receipt.

See pages 28 & 29 of the Rules For Visa Merchants at the below URL:

http://usa.visa.com/download/merchants/rules_for_visa_merchants.pdf

Reply


Yes by Donno Tue October 27, 2009 @ 11:38 PM


What's documented and what actually happens... by Just Jeffrey Wed October 28, 2009 @ 7:01 AM

That's a really good point, also I've noticed... by Kalphoenix Wed October 28, 2009 @ 1:54 PM


Or to put it another way... by Just Jeffrey Wed October 28, 2009 @ 2:19 PM

by James S. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 2:26 PM

Here is a good reason for the merchant to require you to show your ID,
they want to make sure that the card you are using is yours and not
someone elses. The merchant does not know if you are using a credit
card turned off or reported as stolen. When a passenger wants to buy a
seat on a flight or need to pay for other things at my ticket counter,
and they present a Visa debit card from their bank and it says on the
bottom "perfered customer", I politely ask them for a card with their
name on it and a photo ID so that I can make sure that it is their
credit/debit card. Visa should applaud the merchant for asking you to
show your ID.

Reply

by RedheadwGlasses Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 12:50 PM

last I knew/read, merchants are not allowed to ask for picture ID (by
virtue of their card agreements with the credit card companies).

However, given the opportunities for fraud, I think it should be THE
LAW that you have to provide photo ID with any debit or credit card
use.

I work PT at a convenience store gas station, and this would not slow
things down much at all, so that excuse won't fly.

Reply


I was just in Bermuda.. by Harleycat Wed October 28, 2009 @ 10:25 AM

by Just Jeffrey Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 12:45 PM

I've been through similar issues. Turns out, a business can require
you to show ID if they choose. You have the right to refuse, and shop
elsewhere.

It's wrong for a store to claim it's Visa's policy, when it's not.

Here's the thing with Visa: they want you to use their card. Which is
why they have vendor agreements that prohibit activities that would
discourage use of the card. These include credit surcharge/cash
discount, having a minimum, requiring ID, etc.

In general, Visa doesn't mess with businesses that are otherwise
"clean." Radio Shack, for example, is unlikely to get smacked down by
Visa simply because Radio Shack is a sizable business (although not
nearly what it once was) that processes many thousands of credit cards
a day.

Also, there are many ways for a business to get around Visa's rules.

If I were you, I'd focus on complaining to Radio Shack. They used to
require you to give a phone number and address to buy anything -- even
a battery -- but that they've backed off that policy due to a
significant number of complaints.

Demand that the manager show you the corporate policy, if that's his
excuse. If it is corporate policy, ask the manager to give you direct
contact information (not just the customer service number). Promise
not to be specific about which manager provided the information, so
that the manager will feel better about not getting into trouble.

Reply


by NathanG Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 10:51 AM

I could be wrong, and it could be a state by state thing, but at my
night/weekend job we accept Visa Mastercard and discover and we ask
for ID.

Right on the Visa form it says ID may be required before purchase is
authorized. That is on the actual visa paperwork supplied by visa. I
can look tonight when I get there if Im not busy, we have the whole
merchant 10 commandments book somewhere.

whether its correct or not the other commentor had a point, if your
cards get lost/stolen and used by someone you will probably be cursing
the staff for not verifying their IDs.

Reply

by Nate. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 10:30 AM

Many establishments do have a policy that you must present ID. I would
rather show it than make it a hassle.
"I informed the clerk that present photo ID is not required"
I would personally show it than try to argue with a minimum wage clerk
who likely has no idea what a merchant agreement is and is simply
following directions from higher ups on how to do their job.

Hopefully they get in touch with you as they do like to hear about
this thing. Is there a way to contact them directly? I know sometimes
I send in minimums to MC.

Reply


Nate by Chris M Tue October 27, 2009 @ 9:39 PM

minimum wage=stupid? by Nicole F. Tue October 27, 2009 @ 11:44 PM


I'm sick of it, too by Venice Wed October 28, 2009 @ 1:07 AM
by Courtney G. Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 10:18 AM

While it may be a violation of the merchant agreement, I just don't
understand why you wouldn't just show your ID card. Whenever I pay by
credit card, I always have my ID card to show to the cashier just in
case he/she were to ask for it. Most retail companies I have worked
for over the years always wanted me to check ID with a credit card. I
actually had no idea that this was against the merchant agreement
until recently, when I was on another site.

Reply

ID by elbobbo Mon November 30, 2009 @ 9:38 AM

by andbran Posted Tue October 27, 2009 @ 2:04 AM

i bet when your card gets stolen you will definetly support having ids
checked. whenever i use my credit card im grateful when they check

Reply

Me too. by Ginger2.0 Tue October 27, 2009 @ 8:15 AM

by RowdyRetailer Posted Mon October 26, 2009 @ 10:23 PM

Use Cash, No ID necessary! And No Hassles!

Good Day


Reply

I agree by Tooter Tue October 27, 2009 @ 3:07 PM




Home | Shared Letters | Ratings | Login | Communities | Categories | RSS | Contact Us | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | FAQ
Copyright 2014 © All Rights Reserved PlanetFeedback.com | Web by Cicada